Why are racists like this given a platform in major publications?

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An actual headline (today’s, btw) from an actual British paper (@thetimes). I will spare you the full article except that in an attempt to explain the apparent moral degeneracy of black people, black mothers +black culture that has apparently led to a number of young black and brown kids being murdered in London, the author laments that “poverty and racial inequality” are “comfortable answers” and ultimately “PC rot”. He also kindly tells us that “it [I assume he means black culture] is a culture that needs to change, for the sake of the children”, before going on to talk about the “gangsta rap vids, posted on YouTube”. He concludes with this, to describe the life and death of 14 year old Jaden Moodie who was stabbed to death last week in London: “Born into utter hopelessness, with few prospects, because of a culture that another culture – the dominant, white, liberal culture – insists must not be gainsaid.” If that last paragraph does not piss you off then please just unfollow me now. It is ignoramuses like this who are given the opportunity to put pen to paper (or hand to computer) on a regular basis and shape public opinion with their paternalistic, know-it-all, intellectually lazy, logically unsound, uneducated gibberish; repeating the same stereotypical bullshit we have been hearing forever, and that has allowed westerners to justify their exploitation and degradation of people of colour for centuries. Can you imagine being a mother/family member of one of these deceased youngsters and having to read that? BTW- There are some people on this platform who have either questioned or even mocked why I talk about racial issues or stand so strongly against racism. Pls do not ask me again because I won’t smile at you politely like I did last time. If by now you refuse to see what I see, that’s just too bad. I stan for me and mine, even if no one else does. @thetimes hid this behind the paywall, I suppose not expecting certain people to be paid subscribers. but I still read UK publications even from here. And I have subscriptions where necessary. Yah, black people read too. when we aren’t watching gangsta rap vids on YouTube. #canracismdiethisyearplease

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Never Let Anyone Break Your Spirit!

Welcome to the most diverse Congress in US history

Lola’s Soundtrack: My top 10 albums of 2018

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10 albums I’ve had on repeat! (I’ve listened to tons of music but defo these albums had consistently good tracks, as well as being from artists who have been doing work I admire…some v 🔥 debut albums on here too. And v glad to see the UK repping strong!!). Don’t let anybody tell you there’s no good music around! Tell me what I’ve missed! (Don’t tell me about Kanye tho please….🙉!) 1. @iamcardib – Invasion of Privacy 2. @macygrayday – Ruby 3. Prince – Piano and a Microphone 1983 (you should defo listen to this if you’re a Prince fan) 4. @ellamai – Ella Mai 5. @janellemonae – Dirty Computer 6. @phonyppl – Mozaic 7. @tommisch – Geography 8. @theinternet – Hive Mind 9. @bunb – Return of the Trill 10. @champagnepapi – Scorpion #goodmusic

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Lola’s Culture Club: My Top 10 Art Exhibitions & Artists of 2018

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Really enjoyed this art (and these artists) this year too. 1) @tpstudio – I first caught Thomas J Price’s sculptures in London at the excellent @shonibarestudio “Talisman in the Age of Difference” exhibition. Thomas’ sculptures depict black male subjects and explore the relationship between representation and perception. Really cool and interesting stuff. 2 and 3) Lisa Brice – a South African artist who spent a lot of time working in Trinidad. She has a great use of colour and v much enjoyed her depiction of the female body. 4) Hilma Af Klint (her Paintings for The Future exhibition is still on at the @guggenheim in NY until April 23rd 2019), a Swedish artist (1862-1944) whose abstract work was well ahead of its time, mystical and fascinating. Defo a must see. 5) Sculptures by Constantin Brancusi (1876-1957), also at @guggenheim (in its permanent collection) – really interesting to see the African influences in these sculptures. 6 and 7) @fireleibaez’s Joy Out of Fire exhibition at @schomburgcenter was a sight of wonder dedicated to reimaginings of Black women. Now finished but check her out elsewhere. 8) Zimbabwean artist Kudzanai-Violet Hwami’s “Sam in Mother’s Factory”. If in the UK, you can see more of her work at London’s @tyburngallery 9) “Queens No. 2” by @jeremiahquarshie (born in Ghana, lives and works in Lagos, Nigeria). #blackart #blackartists #hilmaafklint #femaleartist #soulfood

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